Let’s Talk About Sex, Baby

Yup, we are going there. A subject that makes a lot of parents (and their teenagers, too!) squirm. But, it’s a fact of life, and you should be talking to them about it. Because like it or not, there’s information everywhere. Good AND bad. And just like we talked to them about staying away from strangers, it’s our job as parents, to give them the right information so they can make the right decisions when it comes to sex. So, let’s delve into it.

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Norovirus Infection – The Stomach Flu

Norovirus

What is Norovirus?

Norovirus is the name for a group of viruses which cause acute gastroenteritis, aka “The Stomach Flu”. According to the CDC, Norovirus causes between 19-21 MILLION cases of the illness each year in the US and is the #1 cause of vomiting and diarrheal illness in the US. Anyone can contract the illness and unfortunately a person can become ill with the same virus more than once and up to 5 times in a lifetime. Cooler months are the peak time for Norovirus infections. Norovirus is not Influenza; influenza is a respiratory illness and Norovirus is a stomach and intestinal illness. The flu vaccine does not prevent this illness.

Symptoms:

The illness typically begins with acute onset of nausea and vomiting with diarrhea following soon afterward. The vomiting phase of the illness typically lasts 12-24 hours with frequent, up to every 20-30 minutes, of vomiting. Some people can have just diarrhea, while others will be hit with many symptoms. Below is a table of common symptoms of Norovirus infections:

Contagion

Norovirus is HIGHLY CONTAGIOUS!!! A sick individual can shed BILLIONS of viral particles while ill. Unfortunately, it can take as little as 18 viral particles to infect someone!!!

Someone ill with Norovirus is contagious from the moment they start to feel ill up to 3 days following the onset of illness. Some people can shed the virus for up to 2 weeks following the illness but it is not clear if they remain contagious the entire time.

The virus is found in vomit and stool and spreads very easily from hand to mouth. You can contract the illness from:

  • Eating contaminated food
  • Touching surfaces or objects with the virus on them
  • Direct contact with a sick person.

The time from exposure to onset of illness, incubation period, is 12-48 hours!

Treatment

There are no vaccines or medications to treat the illness so treatment is supportive while your immune system fights off the illness.

While ill, it is important to drink small quantities, about 1/2 oz, of clear fluid like Pedialyte, low calorie sports drink, oral rehydration fluid or clear juice frequently. Popsicles are an easy way to take in small amounts of fluid over time. Keep drinking small amounts even though the vomiting continues as there is absorption of the fluids which will prevent dehydration. Once the vomiting has resolved, slow advancement of the diet to soft foods is ok.

What not to do while still vomiting:

  • Drink a lot of fluid at once
  • Stop drinking
  • Eat food
  • Leave the house

When to bring your child to the doctor

Bring your child to the doctor if your child has been vomiting for more than 24 hours and is refusing to drink liquids, is too listless to drink or has not urinated at least twice in 24 hours. Please do not bring your child to the doctor when the vomiting starts as the virus can easily spread to many others. Call us if you have questions – our nurses would be happy to talk with you to see if it is appropriate to come into the office or stay home.

Prevention

Preventing exposure is critical to both prevention and containment of the illness. The most important preventive measure is GOOD HAND HYGIENE!

Here are some prevention tips:

  • Wash your hands with hot/warm water and soap. Be meticulous with getting all  parts of you hands and fingers.
  • Alcohol based sanitizers are ok if soap and water are not available but they do  not eliminate Norovirus from your hands.
  • Do not prepare food when ill.
  • Clean and disinfect surfaces using a bleach-based cleaner. If you don’t have a bleach cleaner, make your own with 1 1/2 cup bleach in 1 gallon of water.
  • Wash all contaminated clothes and linens immediately. Handle them carefully and use rubber gloves if available. Use the maximum available cycle length and at least hot water cycle if you can.

DO NOT SEND YOUR CHILD TO DAYCARE OR SCHOOL FOR AT LEAST 48 HOURS !!!

DO NOT SEND YOUR CHILD TO DAYCARE OR SCHOOL IF THEY VOMITED DURING THE NIGHT AND THEY FEEL BETTER IN THE MORNING; HE/SHE IS STILL CONTAGIOUS!!!

20/20 Hindsight

Welcome Spring!  After a long and crazy Rochester winter it is always such a treat to see the flowers bloom and the lilac bushes emerge in Highland Park.  The promise of new life is the happy hallmark of spring.  At Legacy Pediatrics, we have been truly blessed with the birth of many new babies that have joined our Legacy family in the last month or so. Dear families, please know that it is our greatest honor to care for your children and accompany you on this amazing journey that is parenthood.

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Putting Play back into Fitness

When I think back to my childhood, I immediately think about all the time I spent outside exploring the world around me. I remember the walks I would take, the trees I would climb, and the playgrounds I frequented. My favorite was this massive wooden playground that was more fortress to my young eyes than a playground. It had giant turrets, walls and ramps, caves and tunnels…everything! I remember playing with my friends and coming up with new challenges like, “Hey, can we climb through this tunnel without touching the ground?” Or, “I wonder if we can travel all the way around the structure by climbing on the outside…”

Questions like those are the ones that fuel our movement in play; They fuel our quest to discover our boundaries and test our limits. But even more than that, I remember how places like the fortress afforded us the privilege of a blank canvas that only suggested what its intention was, rather than strictly telling us. A ramp winding around the turret was merely suggesting that we could walk up it, while the low and accessible walls to the sides of it hinted that they could also be climbed over, onto, or balanced on.

Having grown up and done extensive research on exercise science, fitness, and devoting over a decade of my life into the emerging field of movement based fitness, when I remember my time spent on these cool playgrounds, I think all the different variations and varieties of movement patterns I had to perform. I think we as a modern society have forgotten that play was our first means of non-essential fitness enhancement. Playing around doesn’t put food on the table or put a roof over your head, but when those things are already attended to, how else will your highly adapted body continue to ensure that you can lift heavy things when you need to, or run away from something when you need to, or climb something when you need to.

We were recently sent this article by one of our members from the Washington Post regarding the recent surge in ADHD diagnoses and it instantly reminded us about why we work so hard to keep the Rochester Parkour Gym open: modern society either doesn’t recognize the importance of play or simply can’t afford the liability associated with public free play. Both reasons are a shame, but the latter is even more than that. Growing liability costs associated with public play spaces are the reason why the beloved fortress of my childhood is no longer there (and also why wooden playscapes and metal jungle gyms in general are no longer built).

State-based Prevalence Data of ADHD Diagnosis (2011-2012): Children CURRENTLY diagnosed with ADHD (Centers for Disease Control)

The playscapes we find in the wild today are strange in comparison to the fortress. They’re bright and colorful, for one, and filled with a soft, squishy ground designed to keep kids from getting hurt. As business owners, spaces like these make a lot of sense. Not only do they lower our liability insurance bills, but they also allow us to higher less educated supervisors and we can up our volume load to let as many kids in as possible. As movement fitness and play specialists, however, this shift in the industry is scary…

When we look at new-designed playgrounds, bounce houses, trampoline parks, and others, we don’t see what’s on the surface. We see brightly colored, inorganic objects and we think of the cognitive disassociation that these kids are developing as the where and when play is allowed (are we only allowed to play in spaces that are squishy, soft, brightly colored, or otherwise?). We see soft and squishy objects and we think of all the improper and unhealthy movement habits that these kids are developing; It is downright shocking to us how many teenagers step foot in our classes and don’t know how to climb with their hands and feet rather than their elbows and knees. We see the inexperienced staff as further re-affirmation of habitual movement patterns that will limit and spawn a whole host of problems for your kids come adulthood – things like: landing on straight legs, running with buckled knees, running with flat feet, etc.

None of these issues are easy to see in the short term, but articles like the Washington Post article linked earlier are helping us to see that the over-abundance and overuse of these characteristics is not without consequence.

Interestingly, we didn’t start the Rochester Parkour Gym because of these reasons – we just naturally created a space that we were familiar with and one that we thought challenged us physically, mentally, and creatively. Initially, our focus was on just operating the space and letting people come in to use it freely as most bounce houses and trampoline parks do. As time went on though, and as we continued to see more and more evidence that the general public had forgotten how to interact with spaces such as ours, we began to shift focus to our current class-based model with a newly found mission to educate the community about the importance of play in rigid landscapes, of movement inspired by one’s creativity rather than demanded by the space they’re in, and of proper, experienced instruction on movement patterns that build our bodies stronger and healthier, rather than patterns that tear us apart, hard landing by hard landing.

We now stand in defiance of these trends and continue to be one of the few successful establishments doing what we do. Operating the way we do isn’t easy: our insurance costs are astronomical, our objects need to be custom-designed and custom built, our instructors and employees had to endure a 3 month long apprenticeship before given their first class, and because all of this, our prices are higher than most people wish they were. Rather than seeing these things as problems that need to be solved, we see them as necessary. These characteristics make us the endangered species that we are, but just like the African Rhino, the Himalayan Snow Leopard, or the Eastern Lowland Gorilla, rigid playscapes deserve to be recognized, cherished, and preserved for the value that they add into our lives.

Rochester Parkour – 1344 University Ave Suite 6000 – Rochester, NY – (585) 204.7537 – info@rochesterparkour.com

Getting started with us at Rochester Parkour is easy. We offer classes for kids and adults ages 3+ which work on an open enrollment platform. You will simply pre-enroll online ahead of time in order to reserve a slot in class. The curriculum for that day stands on its own and doesn’t work in a series. Even if you are the only new student in class that day, you will have a challenge level to tackle that is appropriate for you. Set up an account online here and come to your first class for only $20. You can view our other pricing options here.

About Our Guest Bloggers:

Nicole Suchy is the Administrative Manager and Program Coordinator for the Rochester Parkour Gym. A University of Rochester Alumna, Nicole holds Bachelors in Psychology and Studio Arts.  She runs our in house apprenticeship program and is also an instructor for a variety of classes here at the gym with over 5 years of parkour teaching experience.

Nicole appreciates the extensive diversity found in movement and loves bringing her dance background into her training.  Outside the gym, Nicole is also the founder and director of a local mural arts program, Make Your MARC.

 

 

Charles Moreland is the original co-founder of Rochester Parkour. He is an RIT alum with a bachelor’s degree in Fine Art and Exercise Physiology.

He received his first Personal Trainer certification in 2007 from the NCSF and switched to the NSCA in 2009. Upon graduation in 2010, Charles obtained his Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist title from the NSCA – a gold standard in the industry. With his extensive teaching background, Charles brings a unique, diverse, and research based approach to training.

Charles has been teaching parkour to the Rochester community since 2008 via the Manhattan Square Park Saturday jams and is one of the most experienced instructors in the State and the East Coast. In 2011, Charles was one of the featured speakers at the National Parkour Summit in Seattle, WA. In June 2012, Charles gave a TED talk introducing Parkour to the masses which has since gone viral and has more than 20,000 views worldwide.
Check out Charles’ trainer profile on his Thumbtack site for more information on his professional services.

 

Mindfulness

The new “it” word is everywhere these days – even causing a special edition of TIME magazine, and for good reason.

We at Legacy Pediatrics have seen a huge need for mindfulness practice in today’s children. Mindfulness/Meditation is an evidence based educational practice. Studies find that youths benefit from learning mindfulness in terms of improved cognitive outcomes, social-emotional skills, and well-being. In turn, such benefits may lead to long-term improvements.  Benefits are shown in:  Attention and focus, grades, emotion regulation, behavior in school, empathy and perspective-taking, social-skills, test anxiety, stress, post-traumatic symptoms, and depression.

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Teaching Kids the Giving Spirit

holiday-joyIt’s that time of year again!!!  Let the snow fly and the frantic trips to the mall start!!!  My house has already been bombarded with holiday gift catalogs WAY before November even hit.  It all seems too soon.

So how do we manage the gift craze as parents? Limit the number of presents they get every year? Limit the amount we spend? But then how do we tell family and friends to reign it in (pun intended). Sometimes it seems like the craziness is just too much to try to control.
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Dealing with Change

family-album

“The only constant in life is change” has been attributed to Heraclitus, the Greek philosopher so many years ago. Amazing how this is still pertinent today, in such different times. Regardless of the age, change is difficult for all of us. We become comfortable in some things and it is hard to break out of that comfort zone. I have been thinking a lot about this given my recent move to Legacy Pediatrics. The move was something I had been thinking about for some time…then the timing was just right. As difficult a decision as it was for me, I could not be happier in my new home! No matter how daunting a change may seem, what is scarier is regret.

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Some Vaccine Updates with Dr. Pichichero

 Teenagers and Whooping Cough

When adolescents contract whooping cough, a.k.a. pertussis, they usually don’t whoop but they cough, sometimes for up to 3 months.  So the illness can be quite impactful for patients as well as others because without treatment, patients can be contagious to classmates and family members.  Fighting against pertussis has had its issues thru the years: there has been waning immunity problems after experiencing pertussis infection, the old DTwP vaccine had to be discontinued in the US years ago due to safety issues, and then the newer Tdap has been in the news recently because of the rapidity of waning immunity in teenagers.  In assessing the results of the news a few comments are needed. First the study population was from California and that is a State where pertussis has been circulating much more than in most other States.  Exact reasons for a higher prevalence of pertussis in California are not fully understood, but a high rate of vaccine refusals may be a significant factor.  Secondly, the study used a mathematical model that would provide an estimate of waning immunity.  Nevertheless, the observations alert health care providers and the community that pertussis can occur even in vaccinated teenagers, especially as time passes after vaccination. The solutions are few at this time.  Public health care officials are unlikely to recommend boosters more frequently than already advocated (although that is an option).  Alternative formulations of Tdap to include other or additional ingredients could be a path forward, but the vaccine industry is tackling so many new diseases with vaccine development programs that a push for a better DTaP or Tdap is unlikely in the near term.

Flu vaccine: intranasal or shot?

More and more parents are requesting the intranasal flu vaccine at Legacy Pediatrics and each year we purchase more to accommodate those requests. The kids don’t want the shot and the parents don’t want to deal with the crying or pouting of their kids. The intranasal flu vaccine is live while the shot is a killed virus. The intranasal flu cannot be given to children below age 2 years or to children with asthma. In the news recently, a report described how the intranasal flu vaccine was not as effective as the shot last year (not this year since we don’t know yet). It turns out that the manufacturing process for the intranasal flu vaccine had a problem such that one of the strains in the vaccine was ineffective. Legacy Pediatrics has conducted studies of the different flu vaccines in years past and in those studies, the 2 vaccines performed equally well. So we will stay tuned for further research on this subject and advise the parents of our patients accordingly. Legacy Pediatrics does not currently have any more intranasal flu vaccine for this year and we do not intend to have any more for this season. The manufacturer has been unable to ship anymore to any offices this season. We still have flu shots available and we highly recommend you have you and your child vaccinated – it’s not too late!! We have seen a BIG increase in flu cases in just these past 2-3 weeks. In fact, take a look at the updated NYS Department of Health Weekly Influenza Surveillance Report.

Week Ending March 12th, 2016
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