Legacy Pediatrics Research

Ear Immunity StudyMission Statement

Research gives rise to innovation;
Innovation allows you to lead.
If you are not leading, you are following;
And if you are following, you are behind.

These days the buzzword in the medical field is “Evidence-Based Medicine”. What that means in plain language is to make diagnoses and recommend treatment based on research that shows evidence to prove it is the right thing to do.

At Legacy Pediatrics, we do the research to provide the evidence to the pediatric community so that better decisions can be made about diagnosis and treatment. We are the only practice in Rochester, and indeed in New York State, doing innovative practice-based research. In fact, across the country there may be only a handful of practices like ours.

We pursue office-based research because it benefits our patients.

Boys Exam RoomSince Legacy Pediatrics was founded we have been conducting research on ear infection diagnosis and treatment. With the support of the National Institutes of Health in Washington DC, we have been focused on helping to find a better way to treat ear infections in children. We have found tremendous success. By introducing the concept of individualized care into real clinical practice, we have shown that repeated ear infections can be reduced by over 500% and that the need for ear tubes can be reduced by over 700%. Only Legacy Pediatrics can provide this level of quality and improved care to children in Rochester. We have published our results:

Michael E. Pichichero, MD, Janet R. Casey, MD and Anthony Almudevar, PhD. Reducing the frequency of acute otitis media by individualized care. Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal. May 2013; Volume 32, pages 473-478.

We pursue office-based research because it benefits all children.

In the process of doing our research on ear infections, we have determined very precisely what causes this problem within the immune system of a child. We found that their immune system is slower to mature than the average child. In making this discovery we have found a path forward to help all children worldwide to reduce ear infections.

An example of a child in our papoose right before a tympanocentesis procedure.

An example of a child in our papoose right before a tympanocentesis procedure.

As part of our studies, we unexpectedly discovered that Legacy Pediatrics children who do not stop getting frequent ear infections despite our individualized care, do not only have poor immunity responses to the bacteria that cause ear infections, but also have poor immunity responses to the routine vaccines they receive. We have published our results:

Michael E. Pichichero, MD, Janet R. Casey, MD and Anthony Almudevar, PhD. Nonprotective responses to pediatric vaccines occur in children who are otitis prone. Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal. November 2013; Volume 32, pages 1163-1168.

In 2014 our research continues with NIH support. We are now testing the different types of immunity cells in the body that do not respond to ear infection bacteria and vaccines to find a way to overcome this delayed immunity maturation problem.

Patient Logan SmilesWe also have helped to identify ingredients that could go into a new ear infection vaccine. We hope to be the first practice in the world to test the new ear infection vaccine.

The research team at Legacy Pediatrics consists of our Clinical Research Coordinator, Laurie Pane, RN, as well as all of our talented nurses who work hard to keep the research running smoothly in our office.   If you have any questions regarding our research, please feel free to call the office at (585) 568-8329 or email us at research.legacypeds@gmail.com.